Tuesday, December 11, 2007

Animal Farm: Propaganda Explication

For your final assignment for Animal Farm, you will complete a focused explication on a passage. You will chose one of Squealer's speeches and analyze how Squealer uses propaganda to influence the animals.

Refer to your notes on propaganda techniques to aid in your analysis and the sheet on elements of style. Here is the wikipedia link on propaganda. If you scroll down, you will find several of the techniques I lectured on.

For the entry, you must type out the paragraph(s) you are explicating and provide the explication below.

Your explication should focus on:
1) What is occurring in the passage? What message is Squealer attempting to oppose?
2) What words, methods, techniques does Squealer use to influence?
3) Why is this important to the story, character, scene, etc.?


YOUR OPEN RESPONSE AS WITH ALL YOUR ANALYTICAL WRITING (FROM NOW ON) MUST BE WRITTEN IN THE PRESENT TENSE! You should write also in standard english with no contractions!

You may chose a passage from the following below:

Page 52-53 - The explanation of the milk
Page 69-70 - The explanation of the windmill
Page 96-97 - The explanation of Beasts of England
Page 124-125 - The explanation of Boxer's death


You will be graded on the open response rubric and this is due by 3 p.m. on Friday December 21st.

Watch this interesting video of American-made Anti-communist propaganda:

40 comments:

Jillann C 2 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jillann C 2 said...

“It’s not longer needed, comrade,” said Squealer stiffly. “Beasts of England was the song of the Rebellion. But the rebellion is now completed. The execution of the traitors this afternoon was the final act. The enemy both external and internal has been defeated. In Beasts of England we expressed our longing for a better society in days to come. But that society has now been established. Clearly this song has no longer any purpose.”
Orwell, George; Animal Farm 96

In the passage above from Animal Farm, by George Orwell, Squealer is announcing to the animals that Beasts of England will no longer be their song. He states that the reason for the shunning of the song is because “It’s no longer needed”. Squealer explains that the purpose of the song was to express “longing for a better society in days to come”. He tries to show that the “song has no longer any purpose” since it was for the Rebellion in which has already taken place.

During his speech, Squealer uses an authoritative voice. Judging by the way he goes about making his speech it’s obvious that Squealer wants to be heard and respected. He talks without having an open mind to anything when saying, “In Beasts of England we expressed our longing for a better society in days to come. When Squealer said “we” he assumed that everyone felt the same exact way as him and was not in any way open to change or a new idea. At the end of his speech, Squealer concludes that the “song has no longer any purpose” and doesn’t except any form of protest from the animals. Squealer influenced his speech my being an authoritative, hard-headed pig.

This particular portion of Animal Farm is important to the story because it shows how the animals are being manipulated into following anything Napoleon does/says. By just telling Squealer what to tell the animals, the animals are so obedient that they don’t even realize how gullible they are becoming. This is one of the parts in the book where the animals have become so used to having someone else think for themselves that they don’t even think about protesting anything because they just assume that Napoleon is right all the time.

Elaine T 4 said...

“Comrades!” he cried. “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislikes them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?” (Animal Farm,52)

In this passage, Squealer is trying to convince the other animals that it is okay for pigs to have the milk and apples and that they are not receiving these things because they are better than the others. Squealer is trying to convince everyone else that the pigs actually resent having the special treatment but they can not do anything about it because apples and milk are supposedly good for their well being and their health will only benefit the farm for they conduct farm. Squealer is opposing the other animal’s thoughts on the pigs treating themselves better because they are better.

Squealer uses many techniques in this speech to prove his point. Squealer is speaking in a formal manner by referring to the fellow animals as “comrades.” By speaking in a formal manner he is already starting to isolate himself from his fellow animals. He is no longer part of the group; instead he is shifting from being an everyday pig to a pig of higher authority. Though he denies the pigs and himself having more power or rule over the others, by speaking in a formal manner instead of standard manner, it gives Squealer some authority over the others because he is separating them. He also refers to him and the other pigs as “we” and this is spoken with an authoritative attitude. By speaking in an authoritative attitude and saying “we” and “brainworkers” with some force, and saying how much the farm “depends on [the pigs]” is already giving the pigs more power and rule over everyone else. Moreover, Squealer also uses logos in his speech when he talks about how the pigs eating apples and having the milk is “[proven] by science.” He is using the appeal of knowledge to try to get the other animals to agree with him that the pigs having these benefits are actually a good thing and that it should be allowed.

This speech of Squealer is important to Animal Farm because it is the first time the readers get to see that the pigs are already separating themselves from everyone else and giving themselves power above everyone else. This speech marks the rise of power among all the animals and it also points out a flaw in animalism too. Animalism is the thought that all animals are created equal and that men are the downfall of animals; without men, utopia can be reached. Although it is thought and said that all animals are equal, by giving the pigs special treatment, the equality is already gone. In a way, this speech sets up the rest of the story. The speech highlights how the pigs are gaining power and also points out possible flaws of animalism and why it would not work.

Marissa G 4 said...

"Comrades!" he cried. "You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in spit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to
preserve out health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain
substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brain workers. The whole
management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your
welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely,comrades,"
cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, "surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?" (P 52-53)

In this passage Squealer is trying to defend himself and the other pigs. He is trying to defend against that the other animals realized that the pigs had been
getting the milk and apples. The other animals are not happy about this because they to want to eat
and drink the apple and milk. He is trying to convince the animals that he and the pigs need the milk and apples. He defends himself by telling that it is scientific
proven that pigs need the milk. That they were also the organization of Animal farm, and that without them Animal Farm would fall apart. The message that Squealer is trying to get across is that the pigs already
think that they are better than the others. He is defending
all the pigs. He is stating all the reasons why they need the
apples and milk more than any of the other animals

In his speech Squealer uses many techniques of propaganda to persuade the animals. Squealer
uses appeal to fear, "Jones would come back!", the animals worked to drive Mr. Jones away and to get out from under his rule. Using that if the pigs will not be
able to preform there duties if they do not get the apples
and milk for there brains. If they do not do there jobs to
run Animal Farm the Jones will comes beck. Something the animals surely do not want to happen, so it is appealing to there sense of fear. Squealer also refers to science ". Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig.", this could be appealing to many techniques. It could be appeal to authority because if it was proven in science then the simple minded animals are really going to think that it is true. This could also be a quote out of context because who really knows is apples and milk is really beneficial to a pigs well being. Disinformation because again the animal are going to believe anything that there "leaders" tell them is to be true. It could be all a lie just so the pigs do get the most apples and milk which is what they want. He also says that most pigs do not even like milk and apples, "Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself." he is making it out to be that the pigs really do not want the extra milk and apples, they just need it to function in running and keeping Animal Farm organized. Squealer used many techniques of propaganda to persuade the animals into thinking that the pigs really need the food to function.

This is important to the story. This is the first scene in which we learn that the pigs do feel that they are superior. Also that they think they are what is keeping Animal Farm running. Not that the work of all the other animal have anything to do with animal farms short lived success. This is a lead into the pigs wanting to become man because they are above being an animal and are better than the rest of the animals.

Jeniffer M 2 said...

In the book, Animal Farm, by George Orwell, the pigs try to decieve the other animals in order to recieve power. Squealer, the manipulating pig, always finds a way to convince the other animals that the pigs need more resources than the rest of them.

In the beginning of the story, the author explains Squealer as, "a brilliant talker, and when he was arguing some difficult point he had a way of skipping from side to side and whisking his tail which was somehow very persuasive." (36)Then, when speaking to the animals, trying to persuade them to let the pigs keep the milk and apples, he was, "skipping from side to side and whisking his tail." (52) Therefore, he was clearly trying to mainpulate them with his persuasive actions.

The propaganda technique he uses is disinformation, for example, when he says, "'Milk and apples(this had been proven by science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig.'"(52) This is disinformation because it isn't exactly proven by science that pigs need milk and apples. Therefore, Squealer is lying about the information.

In conclusion, Squealer is a decieving character who uses manipulation and propaganda techniques to convince the other animals of whatever Napolean wants them to believe.

Victoria P. 4 said...

Comrades!” he cried. “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislikes them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?” (Animal Farm,52)

In the passage above it is clear that Squealer is trying to convince the animals that it is necessary for the pigs to get both milk and apples, while the others do not deserve this privilege. Squealer is using a few techniques to try and appeal to the animals and make them see what he is saying is the truth and the only way to run things around the farm. In this passage we can see that the animals may have been questioning why just the pigs are being allowed to get milk and apples. Squealer is saying that the pigs need these things because it is his obligation to Napoleon to make sure that the animals are not having any doubts about Napoleon or any of the other pigs leadership.


Squealer is using not only propaganda but a very threatening and proper manner of speech. It is a threatening way of talking because Squealer mentions the return of Mr. Jones. “Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back!” Squealer knows that the return of Mr. Jones is not what the animals want so he uses this to scare the animals. The animals feel that if they do not abide by what the pigs say then they will end up back under the control of Mr. Jones. Squealer talks down to the animals in many ways and not only in just this speech. He is constantly referring to all the animals as “comrades” and saying how they are not as sophisticated and smart as the pigs. Squealer is using propaganda by trying to relate to the other animals by saying, “I dislike them myself.” He is trying to appeal to what he thinks the other animals want to hear and make it seem like the pigs do not even enjoy the milk and apples that they are taking away from all the other hard working animals. Squealer is not dumb because he knows exactly how to persuade the animals into thinking that everything the pigs do, is going to be a positive affect for the entire farm.


This is an important scene to Animal Farm because it is the first time we see how the pigs feel towards all the other animals. The reader gets the feeling that all the pigs are superior to the other animals. It is important because Squealer is portrayed as a persuasive pig who will stand by Napoleon’s word no matter what outrageous idea Napoleon may get. This scene shows how the pigs will become even more and more in control and how they continuously persuade the animals into thinking that there way is the right way.

Chloe C 2 said...

“Comrades!” he cried. “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proven by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organisation of this farm depend on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?”
Now if there was one thing that the animals were completely certain of, it was that they did not want Jones back. When it was put to them in this light, they had no more to say. The importance of keeping the pigs in good health was all too obvious. So it was agreed without further argument that the milk and the windfall apples (and also the main crop of apples when they ripened) should be reserved for the pigs.
Orwell, George, Animal Farm 52-53

The passage is an excerpt from the allegorical novel Animal Farm by George Orwell. The pigs have recently decided that the apples and milk, instead of being equally distributed among the animals, are to be given exclusively to the pigs. The rest of the animals raised a commotion. Squealer made the above speech using propaganda to influence the animals’ decision. He is trying to convince them that the milk and apples should be given to the pigs instead of to the rest of the animals.

Squealer uses many techniques in order to change the animals’ opinion. He claims that milk and apples are “absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig”. It can be proven wrong because in Jones’s time, pigs did not require such foods and still survived without them. Squealer exaggerated about the pigs’ needs. Also displayed in the phrase is sophisticated vocabulary. He uses large words to confuse the animals and accept his words. Squealer also plays with the animals’ hatred of Jones. He claims that if the pigs do not receive the milk and apples, then Jones will come back to the farm. He manipulates them into believing Jones may come back if the pigs do not get a specific type of food. To further illustrate his image, he acts “pleadingly” in order to gather sympathy on his side. Squealer uses a warped sense of logic in order to fool the animals into believing his point of view. He also lies about his “facts” by claiming that it was “proven by Science”. Squealer lowers the pigs’ standpoint to that of the animals’. That is, he makes them believe that they are all at the same level. He calls them “comrades” even though he insists that the farm would collapse without the pigs. He says that if the “pigs failed in [their] duty”, “Jones would come back”. He even goes so far as to say that eating good food would somehow benefit the animals more than themselves.

Squealer uses trickery to fool his audience into believing that the pigs need the milk and apples much more than the animals do. They also suggest that they deserve it more with Squealer’s words of how the farm would fail if the pigs were not healthy. Squealer represents the media that is fooling the masses into believing lies. He is the source of Napolean’s power because of his persuasive abilities. Relating to Communism, Squealer shows how easy it is to make the crowd believe in lies by simply using some flattery and an extensive vocabulary. Orwell uses Squealer as a idea of what could happen if a country adopted communism.

Thanh N. 4 said...

“It had come to his knowledge, he said, that a foolish and wicked rumour
had been circulated at the time of Boxer's removal. Some of the animals
had noticed that the van which took Boxer away was marked "Horse
Slaughterer," and had actually jumped to the conclusion that Boxer was
being sent to the knacker's. It was almost unbelievable, said Squealer,
that any animal could be so stupid. Surely, he cried indignantly, whisking
his tail and skipping from side to side, surely they knew their beloved
Leader, Comrade Napoleon, better than that? But the explanation was really
very simple. The van had previously been the property of the knacker, and
had been bought by the veterinary surgeon, who had not yet painted the old
name out. That was how the mistake had arisen.

The animals were enormously relieved to hear this. And when Squealer went
on to give further graphic details of Boxer's death-bed, the admirable
care he had received, and the expensive medicines for which Napoleon had
paid without a thought as to the cost, their last doubts disappeared and
the sorrow that they felt for their comrade's death was tempered by the
thought that at least he had died happy.” –George Orwell, 124-125

The passage explains Boxer’s death. All the animals believe that Napoleon sent Boxer to the slaughter house. Being aware of the rumor, Squealer made an announcement that the van has “been bought by the veterinary surgeon”. Knowing that it is Napoleon’s decision, they believe Squealer.

Squealer knows that the animals at the farm will never believe the story he tells. In order to make the animals believe him, he has to use propaganda, considering he is propaganda himself. He brings the appeal to a famous figure like Napoleon to show “their beloved Leader, Comrade Napoleon, better than that”. Squealer also went on about “the admirable care [Boxer] has received”. By telling them that Napoleon only wants the best for them and Boxer, gives them the sigh of relief. Furthermore, Squealer uses false information about the van. The animals did not know what to believe so they think “the can had previously been the property of the knacker, and had been bought by the veterinary surgeon”. His use for Napoleon and false information helps ease the animals mind.

Boxer’s death was one of the important scenes in the story. He was the heart and soul of animal farm and now that he is gone, the animals feel hopeless. Squealer’s speech on how Boxer was sent to “the veterinary surgeon, who had not yet painted the old name out,” is a reliever to the animals. Squealer’s propaganda stops the chaos that will happen from the animals. Boxer encouraged the animals to work harder, and he worked the hardest of all. If they know that Napoleon is lying to them, then Animal Farm will be run differently. There will be many revolts and Animal Farm will perish. Now that Boxer is dead, the animals will work harder to make up all the years he worked. Squealer continues to use the lies to make the animals work more and more each day. Squealer’s speech about Boxer’s death helps the animals concentrate on their work, which is a gain for the pigs.

will h 4 said...

"Comrades!" he cried. "You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in spit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to
preserve out health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain
substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brain workers. The whole
management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your
welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely,comrades,"
cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, "surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?" (P 52-53)



Squealer is trying to convince the animals that the milk and apples are important to the pigs work. he is opposing the idea that the pigs are trying to hog all of the milk and apples. squealer attempts to cover this up by saying most of the pigs do not like the milk, but they need it to get all of their work done.

Squealer uses the animals fear of the farm falling apart so the pigs can keep the milk and the apples. he also says without the extra food the pigs will fail their duties and jones will come back. Squealer pleads all of this to the animals so they will so sympathy towards the pigs and him.

This is very important to the story because it is the first time that the pigs do something to show that they are superior to all animals on the farm. it also tells us that Squealer will be giving his bias expanations to everything that the other animals have doubts about.

Aaron G 2 said...

Three days later it was announced that he had died in the hospital at Willingdon, in spite of receiving every attention a horse could have. Squealer came to announce the news to the others. He had, he said, been present during boxers last hours.
“It was the most affecting sight I have ever seen!” said Squealer, lifting his trotter and wiping away a tear. “I was at his bedside at the very last. And at the end, almost too weak to speak, he whispered in my ear that his sole sorrow was to have passed on before the windmill was finished. ‘Forward, comrades!’ he whispered. “Forward in the name of the Rebellion. Long live Animal Farm! Long live Comrade Napoleon! Napoleon is always right.’ Those were his very last words, comrades.”
Here Squealer’s demeanor suddenly changed. He fell silent for a moment, and his little eyes darted suspicious glances from side to side before he proceeded. (124-125)
Orwell, George, Animal Farm 124-125

In this passage from George Orwell’s Animal Farm, Squealer is giving an incite on Boxer’s death to the animals on the farm. Using the idea of propaganda, Squealer makes the farm believe Boxer died for a noble cause but it was quite the contrary. Squealer also conveys the idea that he and Boxer were almost friends and extremely close at the time of his death. Squealers does all of this to keep the farm running as a unit and not disperse when the “physically powerful leader” dies.
Propaganda is easily expressed by Squealer because he has such a strong voice on Animal Farm. Squealer gets intimate with the farm when he lifts “his trotter and wiping away a tear”, to show his alleged affection he has for Boxer. To get the farms spirits up Squealer explains that Boxer said “Forward, comrades! … Forward in the name of the Rebellion,” to show that Boxer did die for the construction of the windmill and for the rebellion. But Squealer goes over the top when he tells the farm Boxer died saying his famous lines, “Long live Animal Farm! Long live Comrade Napoleon! Napoleon is always right.” By doing this it gives the animals a little warmth in their hearts and to remember all the good things that boxer had done.
This scene in Animal Farm shows the effectiveness that Squealer has to use Propaganda. The book takes a turn when Squealer starts using this technique to get his, and Napolean’s way. The animal are so used to someone else thinking for them they don’t know right from wrong. This gives Squealer the competitive edge to show that Napolean is always right.

Trang T 2 said...

It was almost unbelievable, said Squealer, that any animal could be so stupid. Surely, he cried indignantly, whisking his tail and skipping from side to side, surely they knew their beloved Leader, Comrade Napoleon, better than that? But the explanation was really very simple. The van had previously been the property of the knacker, and had been bought by the veterinary surgeon, who had not yet painted the old name out. That was how the mistake taken…And when Squealer went on to give further graphic details of Boxer’s death-bed, the admirable care he had received, and the expensive medicines for which Napoleon had paid without a cost…at least he died happy.(p126)
To keep all the animals from spreading and discussing the rumor, in this passage above from Animal Farm, Squealer is easily able to pacify all the animals with a simple explanation. He uses his speaking ability and intelligence to persuade other animals. The animals are worried for Boxer and afraid that he has been deceived and being sent to the Knacker. Squealer appears and makes an announcement to put down any rumors. He has twisted the situation successfully. He assumes that what has been heard is wrong and silly. The doctor forgets to paint a new name for the truck that he has just bought it from the Knacker. Squealer tells a lie and it’s obviously for readers to know that. However, with animals’ limited knowledge, this explanation has convinced them and it’s a solution of the rumor. Squealer uses Pathos techniques with a logical appeal.
Furthermore, he adds some more details about Boxer’s death. Boxer has been taken care with meticulously medications and expensive medicines. Unfortunately, Boxer couldn’t get over it and he dies due to his illness. To make this explanation more convincible, Squealer pretends to cry and it makes animals think that he’s real honest. He uses Pathos method to appeal the animals’ emotion. They are relief when they finally know that Boxer dies peacefully.
This passage in the book is significant because it tells us how the pigs are trying to betray the innocent animals by breaking laws to fit their benefits, and how easy to convince them with simple explanations. Napoleon uses Squealer as a tool to communicate with other animals. Boxer is a hard worker and he has contributed his work to the animal farm, without him the farm would not be successful. However, the pigs still take advantage of him till the end of his life. They never seem to respect and appreciate what Boxer has done to the farm. Through this scene, the author wants to prove to us that Animalism ideal would never work out. Orwell has shown us how powerful propaganda can be and how they influence people. Squealer is a form of propaganda and he handles everything. The truth about Boxer’s death is always a mystery and would never be discovered.

Jillian D 2 said...

"Comrades!" he cried. "You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in spit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to
preserve out health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain
substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brain workers. The whole
management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your
welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely,comrades,"
cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, "surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?" (52)
Squealer, who “actually dislike[s] milk and apples”(52) is trying to tell the other animals that the pigs should have the apples and milk “to preserve [their] health”(52). Squealer is trying to show the fact that if the other animals do not give up the milk and apples, than “Jones would come back!”.(52) He is trying to scare them into doing this because the pigs are selfish.
Squealer is using propaganda to trick the animals to give in. He tried getting the animals to feel guilty because “it is for [the animal’s] sake that [the pigs] drink the milk and eat those apples”(52). He wants the animals to give them everything because it is the pig’s duty to make sure that Jones doesn’t come back.
This speech is important to the story because it shows the true colors of the pig and how they would do anything to get exactly what they want. It also shows that the animals worship the pigs and they will not say anything to stop them.

Lynn T. 4 said...

Page 52-53 - The explanation of the milk

In this passage of “Animal Farm” by George Orwell, Squealer is attempting to trick his fellow comrades into thinking that milk is more vital to pigs than any other animal. He uses propaganda to persuade everybody that the farm’s foundation was built by the pigs. Considering that they built the farm, Squealer thinks that pigs should get all the milk and apples.

Squealer uses appeal to authority when he tells the other animals that the farm would be nothing without the pigs. Squealer claims that “the whole management and organization of this farm depend on” (52) the pigs, so without them this farm and animalism would collapse. He then uses appeal to fear, when he threatens them that Mr. Jones will come back if the pigs failed their duties. The milk and apples will give the pigs energy so that they will not fail their duties. Then Squealer tries to sound intelligent by telling everyone that “milk and apples…has been proved by Science…” that it contains “substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig.” (52) Squealer is trying to sound like a hero by accepting all these apples that he does not even need, because he is a pig so it is essential to his health. He has a façade where he is willing to sacrifice anything for his comrades. “Many of us actually dislike milk and apples,” (52) Squealer says to assure them that this act was not what they wanted but it was necessary.

This passage is important because Squealer begins to belittle the other animals. He considers the pigs the “brainworkers,” (52) and everybody is lost without them. By not giving everybody a fair share of apples and milk, the power is shifting. If one animal gets more than another, than it is not equal, it is not animalism.

evelyn L 2 said...

“Comrades!” he cried. “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislikes them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?” (Animal Farm,52-53)


In this passage from Animal Farm by George Orwell, Squealer the pig, is trying to convince the rest of the animals on the farm that it is a necessity for them to drink the cows milk and have the apples. At the same time saying that the pigs are not better than anyone else, instead they resent having these luxuries. Squealer says that without them (the pigs) the farm would not function at all, they are the “brainworkers” and that’s why things function correctly. Squealer also convinces them that if the pigs are not given these foods, Jones will come back, and no one obviously wants that.

The purpose for this passage is important because it shows how things are going to change in the farm, soon. This is the beginning of Squealer’s tactics to persuade the animals to follow and trust what his decisions are for the best of the farm. The main reason they really did follow and not put up any argument is because they thought the pigs really did have all the knowledge, and since they don’t, why not just follow? This scene shows that the pigs leadership in the farm is being separated from the rest and that further on, more and more power will be handed to them.

The authors choice of wording, is very persuasive and chosen carefully. When Squealer speaks using words and phrases such as “comrades”, “us”, and “watching over you”, he relates, or at least tries to relate to the other animals, warming up to them so their trust is gained. He cant just go to them and say ‘Okay us pigs are taking the milk and apples bye!’, and outrage will happen amongst them if that were to happen. Also Orwell, makes Squealers speech sound reasonable and smart. Threatening the animals that without the pigs, Jones will come back is one of the most important things he could say, because everyone knows that no one wants that, and if the pigs getting more food prevents that, it will be done.

sandy j 2 said...

In this passage, squealer is explaining to the animals that the pigs need the milk and the apples so they can do their job. The milk that the cows make will from now on be for the pigs solely. The pigs consider themselves superior to every other animal, so whatever food is good and whatever they all like, they get to keep it. Squealer can easily convince the animals to just accept this concept because he’s so persuasive.’ Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health.’ Squealer is lying and is being deceitful when he says that the pigs don’t like the milk and the apples to trick the other animals. He wants to make it seem like if the pigs don’t get them; animal farm is in danger of failing because the pigs are the “brainworkers”. The message squealer is attempting to oppose is the milk and the apples is for all the animals considering they’re all equal. Everybody works to their capacity so therefore every one gets the same food and the same quantity and he’s changing that.

Squealer used the fear appeal technique to scare the animals in giving the pigs the milk and the apples. He said ‘Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back!’ Squealer is trying to scare the animals by threatening that Jones is coming back. He knows that no animals would want him back so they wouldn’t have to work like slaves anymore, and all their work would be for them and not for humans. To prove that he’s being rational squealer also said ‘it is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples.’ He’s making it seem like this is not even about the pigs, it’s about making their farm better. In the process of making their farm better, they need the milk and the apples to work.

It is important to the story because it shows the beginning of a government. It demonstrates how the pigs are using everything to their advantage and becoming more and more in charge. The pigs are taking over little by little and they’re doing that by using their intelligence. The other animals don’t know better, so anything that squealer says, if he provides an explanation and uses words they can understand, they instantly agree with them. It’s important to the pigs because now they get the luxury of eating what they want without any animal opposing. The other animals can eat hay and other things while they get to eat the better food.

Consuelo T 2 said...

Page 52-53 - The explanation of the milk
“Comrades!” he cried “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk, and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this had been proved by Science, comrades) contains substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs fail in our duty? Jones would come back! Surely comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?”

In this passage from Animal Farm, by George Orwell, the other animals are upset because they have found out that the pigs have been taking up all the milk and apples for themselves. Squealer is sent to persuade the other animals that the pigs need the apples, and, milk. He persuades them by telling them that the pigs are the brainworkers, and that it is for the pig’s health. He also mentions that the running of the farm depends on the pigs. He continues to say that if the pigs do not consume the apples, and milk that they can not fulfill their duties, and in result Jones will come back.

In his speech Squealer uses the appeal of fear. He uses this by telling the other animals that if the pigs do not eat the apples, and drink the milk that Jones will come back. This is appealing to the animals’ fears because they do not want Jones back. As a result the animals are more content on the pigs consuming all the milk and apples. Squealer, in some ways, is also using the flag-waving technique. He’s trying to justify the pigs eating the apples, by making it sound that it’s benefiting the other animals. Squealer appeals to the other animals by telling them that “It is for [their] sake that [they] drink that milk and eat those apples”(p52).

This passage is important to the story because it shows how easily influenced the animals are. The animals are not smart enough to question the pigs, and their ways. They are gullible, and will believe anything they are told, because they are not clever enough. The animals just do what they are told is right. This passage is also important because it show how the pigs are starting to abuse there power. They see now, how easy it is to convince them of anything. This leads to more speeches, and changes.

In conclusion Squealer uses methods of propaganda to persuade the other animals. He uses fear, and other methods of propaganda to influence the other animal’s judgment. This leads to more deception, and manipulation through out the story.

Mat M. 4 said...

“It’s no longer needed, comrade,” said Squealer stiffly. “Beasts of England was the song of the rebellion. But the rebellion is now completed. The execution of the traitors this afternoon was the final act. The enemy both external and internal has been defeated. In Beasts of England we expressed our longing for a better society in the days to come. But that society has now been established. Clearly this song has no longer any purpose.”
Squealer (Pg. 96-97)

In the above passage of the novel Animal Farm by George Orwell, Squealer was addressing to the animals, the rebellion song “Beasts of England” is “no longer needed.” He believes that because the rebellion is behind them that it should be used no longer. He explains that it was originally sung to show how they wanted their enemies to fall thus creating a better society for themselves. Their enemies being the humans and the traitors among them are gone and give them reason for them to continue without “Beast of England”.

Squealer does very well to influence the animals by using propaganda. Squealer explains how in “Beasts of England” that the animals sought “for a better society” which in fact the song does convey. The song expressed what every animal including “Cows and horses, geese and turkeys” felt for a world where “All must toil for freedom’s sake.” However, Squealer explains, “society has now been established” despite the execution of the traitors. It is obvious that execution is not in the best interests of freedom and how a new society was meant to be. Yet, Squealer uses that propaganda to justify Napoleons actions and abuse of his power.

This is important to the story because it shows how propaganda can influence people that turmoil and tragedy is justified. This scene adds structure to the story by reveling how Squealer is loyal to Napoleon. This also symbolizes how communism corrupts the weak minded into believing that this system of government is ideal when in reality it is the cause of many conflicts.

Andy T. 4 said...

Page 69-70 - The explanation of the windmill
“‘Comrades,’ he said, ‘I trust that every animal here appreciates the sacrifice that Comrade Napoleon has made in taking this extra labour upon himself. Do not imagine, comrades, that leadership is a pleasure! On the contrary, it is a deep and heavy responsibility. No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal. He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves. But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where should we be? Suppose you had decided to follow Snowball, who, as we now know, was no better than a criminal?’ ‘He fought bravely at the Battle of the Cowshed,’ said somebody. ‘Bravery is not enough,’ said Squealer. ‘Loyalty and obedience are more important. And as to the Battle of the Cowshed, I believe the time will come when we shall find that Snowball’s part in it was much exaggerated. Discipline, comrades, iron discipline! That is the watchword for today. One false step, and our enemies would be upon us. Surely, comrades, you do not want Jones back?’”

In this passage from Animal Farm by George Orwell, Squealer tells all the animals what a great leader Napoleon is and that Snowball is the complete opposite. Snowball has just been chased out of the farm by the dogs and Squealer tries to convince everyone that Snowball was making wrong decisions. Squealer believes that Snowballs “Bravery is not enough,’ said Squealer. ‘Loyalty and obedience are more important.’”(Pg.70)which he thinks Napoleon has. Snowballs idea of building a windmill is criticized by Squealer and that the animals would have made a very bad decision if they were to follow Snowball.

Squealer is much more intelligent than the other animals. He uses that to his advantage to try to convince the other animals. He believed that Snowball was a criminal and that is was the right thing to do that he was chased out. Squealer convinces the other animals that Snowball’s part in the Battle of the Cowshed was exaggerated and that they will soon see. Squealer once again uses his intelligence to threaten the animals that if they were to make “One false step,”(Pg.70) that Jones would be back to take over again. This scene will show how hypocritical Napoleon will be later on and the animals have a disadvantage in these situations because of their lack of knowledge.

Squealer helps keep the animals loyal and obedient to Napoleon and is always trying to make Snowball look bad compared to Napoleon. Squealer’s intelligence helps him persuade the other animals while using propaganda. He threatens the other animals that Jones can come back if they make one mistake. His manipulation of the animals helps him control all of them and he is able to convince everyone to believe in everything he says.

Malik B. 4 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Malik B. 4 said...

Squealer’s explanation of the milk and apples- p.52

“Comrades!” he cried. “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?”

Squealer of George Orwell’s, Animal Farm often attempts to use propaganda to sway the views of his “comrades”. The animals on the farm became leery of the sudden disappearance of the apples and milk. To address the other animal’s confusion, Squealer uses “scapegoat” propaganda in which he attempts to use their curiosity to condemn them for ever questioning the “brainworkers”. While blaming them he also attempts to relate to the rest of the animals to “preserve” equality. To instill guilt in his “comrades” Squealer rhetorically asks, “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege?”. Squealer refuses to admit to the other animals that the pigs have been benefiting with milk and apples at the expense of others. Squealer makes an effort to draw attention away from the other pigs and himself using guilt, as he accuses the animals of losing sight or their goal.

Squealer influences his peers most effectively using guilt. Squealer explains, “We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us.”. In a selfish manner, Squealer relays the fault on his unaware companions. When the return of Jones is mentioned, Squealer is then adding fear to propagate his and the other pigs’ innocence.

At this point in the novel the animals have nearly complete trust in the pigs because the pigs have yet to prove their betrayal. This incident seems to have been the point at which doubt in the pigs was established. This speech also seems to foreshadow a decline in Animalism as the support it once had recedes. When Squealer doubtfully asks, “[S]urely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?”. As Squealer continues to bombard the animals with guilt it becomes more and more evident that he feels as though support is lacking among them. With morale at a seemingly all time low, Squealer resorts to aggressive persuasion in the form of propaganda. Squealer’s attempts only appear to add to the animals’ suspicion, which overtime will lead to Animalism’s decline.

laura b said...

“Comrades!” he cried. “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?” (Animal Farm,52)

In this passage from George Orwell's Animal Farm, Squealer is giving a speech about why the milk should be consumed by the pigs only. He is trying to convince the other animals that the Pigs' "selfishness and privelege[d]" acts are in fact for the good of the farm. His words are full of passion and almost accusatory of the animals themselves, turning the guilty finger on those complaining. He uses propoganda techniques such as fear, repitition and disinformation in attempt to influence the other animals in beleiveing that they are in the wrong for questioning the motives of the pigs.
Using fear of what they do not know, Squeler tells the animals that the "pigs are [the] brainworkers" suggesting that without them, the farm would be as bad or worse as before. He also plays upon their fears that "Jones would come back" knowing that even the name of the former master will make many not question the pigs again because they beleive nothing could be worse than the human master. He is trying to fill the aniamls with anxiety of Jones returning so they will be submissive. He uses repitition by saying this threat three times, as if a cry for support, and to drill the image of Jones' return into the animals head. When Squealer tells the animals that "milk and apples contain substances absolutelyl necessary to the well being of a pig" he is implementing the disinformation technique because the two foods would proabbly be beneficial for any of the animals and certainly are not necessary for the pigs.
This speech is important in two ways. First, it indicates a turning point in the rebellion on the farm becasue the pigs are no longer persuading the animals to follow along, but are instead defending themsleves againest what the other animals are now seeing as inequalities. It is also signifigant to the character of Squealer becasue the speech is consistent with his characters devious use of language to confuse, scare, and brianwash the aniamls. It showcases his great abilty to get the animals back in line. Animal Farm, like the world it was meant to mock, and the world we live in today, is full of personalities taking any opportunity to take advantage of another.

Belinda L 4 said...

“Comrades,” he said, “I trust that every animal here appreciates the sacrifice that Comrade Napoleon has made in taking this extra labour upon himself. So not imagine, comrades, that leadership is a pleasure! On the contrary, it is a deep and heavy responsibility. No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal. He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves. But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where should we be? Suppose you had decided to follow Snowball, with his moonshine of windmills—Snowball, who, was as we now know, was no better than a criminal?”
“He fought bravely at the Battle of Cowshed,” said somebody. “Bravery is not enough,” said Squealer. “Loyalty and obedience are more important. And as to the Battle of Cowshed, I believe the time will come when we shall find that Snowball’s part in it was much exaggerated. Discipline, comrades, iron discipline! That is the watchword for today. One false step and our enemies would be upon us. Surely, comrades, you do not want Jones back?” (Orwell 69-70)

In this passage from Animal Farm, by George Orwell, Squealer uses propaganda to influence the other animals that Napoleon is right to take away their ability to vote and make decisions in the farm. Squealer uses the fear of Mr. Jones to his advantage by mentioning his name to influence the other animals emotionally into believing him. By doing this, Squealer is attempting to oppose the protests of the animals when Napoleon announces that there will be no need of the Sunday Morning Meetings. This shows the audience just how much of an influence Squealer has compared to Napoleon and it also shows how gullible the animals really are.

Squealer uses propaganda to influence the animals to listen to Napoleon. He says that “every animal here appreciates the sacrifice that” (Orwell 69) Napoleon makes in eliminating their Sunday morning meetings. Squealer is somehow able to mislead the animal’s feelings about this announcement by presenting selective facts on the issue to cause an emotional effect from the animals. He states that Napoleon is actually “taking this extra labour on himself” (Orwell 69) because he cares about the farm and the decisions that the animals make. Napoleon wants to make sure that the animals will not “make the wrong decisions” (Orwell 69) so as to end up in the same position that Snowball is in. Squealer uses the animal’s emotions to get them to change their minds. He tells them that leadership is not a pleasure but “a deep and heavy responsibility” that Napoleon must take in order to keep the animals from making the same mistakes as Snowball. Squealer also takes advantage of how naïve the animals are and tells them that “loyalty and obedience” (Orwell 70) is more important than bravery and also that if there is no loyalty and obedience, Jones will come back. From hearing this, the animals question no more with only one thing in mind, life is better now that Jones is not here. This shows the audience that Squealer has a huge effect on how the animals feel and think because of his ability to influence others at his will. Squealer is shown to actually have more influence on the animals than Napoleon himself, but Squealer does not complain or show that he is better because he is not a natural leader, but a follower. By being able to influence the animals, Squealer helps reveal to the audience that the animals are all very naïve and gullible. This also answers the question on how Napoleon is able to control them and why they have not rebelled yet,. Because they believe everything they hear from Squealer, which leads to their downfall in becoming ruled again by Napoleon instead of Jones.

Squealer uses propaganda to gain trust and to sway the emotions of the animals. He convinces them that Napoleon is doing them a favor by controlling their right to vote because he does not want them to end up like Snowball. Squealer also uses the emotional effect to get the animals to believe that loyalty and obedience is more important than bravery because with out those two things, Jones will come back. Squealer is shown to be able to sway the animal’s opinions at any moment. He is what causes the animals to distrust their first instinct, which leads them to right where they began, being slaves to an owner.

Jen-T 4 said...

“It’s no longer needed, comrade,” said Squealer stiffly. “Beasts of England was the song of the Rebellion. But the Rebellion is now completed. The execution of the traitors this afternoon was the final act. The enemy both external and internal has been defeated. In Beasts of England we expressed out longing for a better society in days to come. But that society has now been established. Clearly this song has no longer any purpose.”


Through the book Animal Farm by George Orwell, the character Squealer tries to oppose many things. One thing he tries to oppose is the singing of the song Beasts of England. The song was first sung to the animals by Old Major, who started the rebellion against man in the beginning. When he died it became the theme song for the animals, they would sing it everyday after they finished working.


When Squealer abolishes the singing of Beasts of England, he ruins the moral for the animals. He tries to tell them that the song was for “rebellion” (96) and that “rebellion is now complete” (96) so there is no need for the song any longer. This shocks the other animals in the farm because they were proud of the song, it symbolized there togetherness, always reminded them of there goals which was to all be equal and lastly to never forget that they were fighting a war against man, not other animals.


Squealer not only abolishes the singing of Beasts of England, but he also had Minimus the poet, “compose another song” (96) to which they could replace for Beasts of England. “Animal Farm, Animal Farm, Never through me shalt thou come to harm!” (70). Squealer tried to replace the song with a new one but it never “seemed to the animals to come up” (70). The song had no meaning to the animals like Beasts of England did, Squealer only made it to make the transition easier for the animals.


In the book Animal Farm by George Orwell, squealer tries to oppose the singing of Beasts of England. He does this by abolishing its singing and creating a new song to replace it.

casey w. 4 said...

“Comrades!” he cried. “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislikes them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?” – Written George Orwell, the Author of Animal Farm (pg.52)

In the book Animal Farm by George Orwell lays a persuasive character named Squealer. Squealer is part of a farm that goes by the name of Animal Farm. This farm was recently taken over by the animals which mean these animals have full control over this place. In the beginning the farm had the intentions that everyone should be treated equally. However, the pigs get greedy from holding to much power, because of their intelligence. This is when Squealer must step in and convince the rest of the animals that some animals are obligated to certain things. Squealer does this by using different techniques of propaganda to keep the farm under the pig’s thumbs.

In this specific passage Squealer must convince the rest of the animals on the farm that pigs deserve to have the right to eat apples and drink the milk because they are the “brainworkers.” Squealer starts off his speech with using a method known as Ad Hominem. This is when a person attacks the other side of the argument. He makes it sound ridiculous that the farm would think the pigs were only eating and drinking the apples out of “selfishness and privilege.” He then plays the sympathy card with the other animals by trying to make them feel bad because pigs “actually dislike milk and apples.” He even goes so far to convince the animals that the pigs were only eating and drinking the apples “for [their] sake.” Then Squealer throws in his last couple of punch lines by combing two methods of propaganda. These methods are the Appeal to Fear and Black-and-White Fallacy. Squealer creates the Appeal of Fear method by scaring the animal of thinking that “Jones [could] come Back” if the pigs “failed in [their] dut[ies]” on the farm because they are, like said in the beginning the “brainworkers” of what goes on in the farm. Squealer basically puts it on the animals, that if they do not approve the pigs of getting these obligations then they are siding with the enemy and this is when the Black-and-White Fallacy comes in to play. In this case Squealer gives these animals two options that if they do not agree with the pigs on this then they are hurting the farm. Squealer is a type of Character that every leader would want to have because he can persuade anyone into believing that the leader is right. He simply does this by cleverly combining the appropriate forms of propaganda at any given time.

Squealer is a key character in this story and to the farm because without him Animal Farm would have faced many rebellions from angry animals. He is always their when a problem or a complaint between the animals and the leader Napoleon erupt. He his great with his words and always knows what techniques he should use to influence the thoughts of others. Our lives today are filled of characters like Squealers. Especially, when elections for different things come around; and the sad part is most people let propaganda influence their minds, exactly how Squealer tricks the animals on Animal Farm.

Herman T 2 said...

Comrades!” he cried. “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?” (Animal Farm, 52)
In the above passage from Animal Farm, Squealer, a pig that manipulates the minds of the other animals within the farm. This passage shows how Squealer is coaxing their simple minds with his title as a “brainworker”. Squealer is trying to oppose the commandment that stated that all animals are equal. Squealer does this by demonstrating the pigs as victims of the “milk” incident. Squealer is helping to benefit the pigs in a subtle manner in which the animals are convinced by Squealer that the pigs were in need of these supplies even though they disliked them.
The overall importance of the passage is Squealer’s opposition to the commandments. Squealer does this by explaining how the pigs were the building blocks of their society. Pigs are the brains behind the society’s survival. Squealer is making it seem like a bad thing for them when he is really trying to gain power and influence among the animals that pigs are superior without actually mentioning it.
Squealer uses reverse psychology to influence the other animals. By saying that he disliked apples and milk, the animals infer that the pigs are taking a risk to help their society. However, Squealer is secretly brainwashing the animals into believing that the pigs are taking a big risk by taking away the apples and milk while he secretly making the pigs more powerful.
This passage is important to the story because Animal Farm is an allegory. Animal Farm symbolizes the idea of communism (Animalism). This passage displays the flaws within this “Animalism” society because Animalism is the belief that all animals are equal, but Squealer is taking advantage of the foolishness of the animals. Squealer’s messages signify the end of Animalism and the beginning of Totalitarianism.

Jessica F 2 said...

"Comrades!" he cried. "You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in spit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to
preserve out health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain
substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brain workers. The whole
management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your
welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely,comrades,"
cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, "surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?" (P 52-53)

In this passage Squealer is trying to get the point across that the pigs are most important. He is saying that the pigs need the apples and milk because the other animals found out they were getting them. Squealer tries to make the other animals believe that without the pigs Animal Farm would never exist so the pigs deserve the apples and milk more then any other animal on Animal Farm. Squealer also tries to say that it is scientifically proven that pigs need the apples and milk.

Squealer uses many techniques to prove his point. Squealer uses words like “comrades” to show he is superior to the other animals. Squealer also used the fear of Mr. Jones. The animals don’t want him coming back. Squealer threatens then saying “Jones would come back!” to scare them into doing work for the pigs to eat. Squealer also lies and tries to say that it “has been proven by Science” that the pigs need the milk and apples. But we all know that is not really the case. Squealer is just lying so he can defend the pigs.

I think this scene is really important because we really learn a lot about the pigs here. We learn that they think they are superior to everyone else and that they deserve so much more. But we know that they don’t do any actual physical work just the thinking. They think they hold Animal Farm together which I disagree with because if they didn’t come up with the ideas, someone else would. But this passage really shows how they are gaining power because the rest of the animals go along with this and allow them to take everything over.

Katherine Z 4 said...

Page 52-23 Explanation of the Milk

In this passage the animals find out that the pigs have been drinking all the milk and eating all the apples. Squealer doesn’t want the animals to start thinking that there is anything wrong with the pigs eating and drinking all the precious food tries to convince them that it’s the pigs’ right. Instead of admitting wrong, Squealer convinces the animals that the pigs doesn’t want to eat and drink the foods, they have to because they need the food to be able to think and work properly. Squealer also persuades the animals that the pigs are the sole mind work of them farm, without them around there will certainly be chaos.

In this persuade speech Squealer uses many different techniques. Of the techniques he uses is be repeating the words “we, you, and us”. By using those pronouns Squealer is convincing the animals that they are all in this together. “Day and night we are watching over your welfare” [p.52] Squealer uses the word “we” in this passage to state that all the pigs are working hard to provide all the things that the animals needs. All the things the pigs do are for the benefit of the animals in the farm. Another technique that Squealer uses in his speech about the milk and apples is the use of fear. “Do you know what would happen if we pigs fail in our duty? Jones would come back!” [p.52] Squealer reminds the animals that if the pigs don’t do their part of the job in the animal farm, Jones will definitely come back. Squealer is using Jones as a way of scaring the animals, since all the animals don’t want Jones to come back, they will naturally listen to whatever reasons that Squealer uses.

This speech is important to the story because this speech is showing that the pigs are starting to take advantage of the animals. All the animals wants animalism, a society where all the animals are equal, no one is above the other. However, since the pigs are stealing the milk and eating all the apples, they’re showing that they are superior to the other animals. This can also be a foreshadowing of the events that will likely occur in later on in this story. This is only the beginning; the pigs send Squealer to convince the other animals that the pigs need the food that they take. Later on in the story, the pigs will continue to take advantage of the other animals, if they get away with one thing they will surely get away with others.

Amir Q. 4 said...

“It was the most affecting sight I have ever seen!”said Squealer, lifting his trotter and wiping away a tear. “I was at his bedside at the very last. And at the end, almost too weak to speak, he whispered in my ear that his sole sorrow was to have passed on before the windmill was finished. ‘Forward, comrades!’ he whispered. ‘Forward in the name of the Rebellion. Long live Animal Farm! Long live Comrade Napoleon! Napoleon is always right.’ Those were his very last words, comrades.”

Squealer is trying to cover up Boxer’s true cause of death and is also sickeningly twisting the situation to the pig’s advantage. Squealer’s tone of voice is very sympathetic as he is saying this, as to add to the illusion. He states that he was with Boxer when Boxer was on his death bed, while in truth the pig’s selfishly sent Boxer to a glue factory to further exploit even after death him and use him to gain more profit, and is trying to convince the other animals that that is what really had happened to Boxer. He is trying to deny the fact that Boxer was sent to a glue factory and instead tells them that he died peacefully and his last message was to support the pigs.

Squealer uses many techniques and methods to influence the animals. He mainly relies on testimonial propaganda to gain their support. He twists Boxer’s gruesome death (one that the pigs, including him, caused) into a story to support the current government. The pigs are very selfish and careless leaders, they would force their workers to toil away for days only so that the pigs can take the spoils of their work. Even in after his death, they use their best worker (Boxer), to gain a profit by selling him for glue. Even worse is the fact that Squealer is twisting the information to gain sympathy for the government and to further their goals. Squealer paints vivid images as he talks and also simplifies his language as so the lesser educated animals can still understand him and everyone can get the message. His use of the phrase, “Napoleon is always right.” (Which is often said by Boxer) furthers validates his statement.

This scene occurs near the climax of the story and results in the death of a main character. In the scene, Boxer, a powerful horse and the best worker on the farm (an inspiration to all others on the farm) dies. Everyone is disheartened by his death yet even more-so by what is written on the side of the van that comes to take him away. The van shows that he is going to be taken to a glue factory; the animals desperately try to get him free yet it is to no avail. This scene also tells the reader how low the pigs will go to advance their agendas. Squealer lies to the public and turns this horrible tragedy (caused by the pigs themselves) into something to further aid in their own cause.

Kellie L 4 said...

The explanation of the milk (52-53)
“Comrades!” he cried “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk, and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples contains substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs fail in our duty? Jones would come back! Surely comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?”

In the above passage, George Orwell gives Squealer the ability to trick the other animals by using propaganda. Squealer tells the other animals that the pigs are the brain workers and they do not like the apples and the milk, but it is necessary for their health. In a way, Squealer is trying to tell the other animals that without the pigs, they would not amount to anything. Also, Squealer assures the other animals that the pigs are not being selfish and they should never assume something like that.

During Squealer's speech, he uses many techniques to persuade the other animals. First, he says that he dislikes apples and milk, but it is necessary for their health. Obviously Squealer does not fully "dislike" the meal because if he did, he would not have been hiding it from all of the other animals. Also, Squealer questions the animals on what they think would happen if the pigs fail their duties. This technique was very strong in my opinion because it makes the other animals picture the worst of things that could have happened without the pigs. Finally, the last method that Squealer uses is bringing Mr. Jones back into the story. He says that without the pigs there, Mr. Jones would have come back. First of all, this debate was not about Mr. Jones coming back, it was about the pigs eating all of the milk and apples. He tricks the other animals by changing the subject towards a negative effect.

This speech is important to Animal Farm because it now seperates the animals. Also, it is the turning point of the pigs' superiority towards the other animals as well. Also, Squealer represents all of the pigs as untrustworthy, doubtful, and back-stabbers in this passage because the audience now sees the real personalities of all of the pigs.

Ngoc D. 4 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Cristina V 2 said...

“Comrades!” he cried. “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in the spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contains substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depend on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades!” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?” (Animal Farm 52)

In this passage, Squealer tries to persuade the other animals that it is okay for the pigs to eat the apples and drink the milk by telling them that the milk and apples are essential to the pigs’ health and well-being. He also says that without the pigs the farm would fail and Jones will return. Squealer makes it clear that the pigs, including himself do not enjoy eating apples and drinking milk, therefore it will not seem as if the pigs are deliberately being given special treatment.

Squealer uses different techniques to persuade the other animals that they, the pigs, are not being treated any better than the rest of them. However, by using the term “Comrades” he is speaking in a formal manner, and by speaking to the animals in a formal manner, he is specifying that he is of higher authority than the rest of the animals. He also refers to the pigs as “we” and “the brainworkers” which implies that all the pigs are of a higher authority, not just Napoleon. Also, by saying “brainworkers” he is telling the animals that they are responsible for what the farm has accomplished and without them the farm will not continue to prosper.

Squealer’s speech is important to Animal Farm because now the reader can see that the pigs have already begun to separate themselves from the rest of the farm. The pigs are convincing the animals that they are not superior when really, they are. This passage shows the rise of the pigs’ power and that in Animalism, not all animals are equal.

Ngoc D. 4 said...

Pages 52-53

“Comrades!” he cried. “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?”

In the above passage from Animal Farm by George Orwell, Squealer is trying to persuade the rest of the animals in Animal Farm that it is necessary for the pigs to get the apples and milk to themselves. The animals begins to murmur when they learns the fact that the milk and apples were going to the pigs and not to be equally distributed among the animals. Squealer denies that it is unequal for the pigs to receive all of the milk and apples because they are the “brainworkers” (52) of the farm. Squealer explains that it “has been proved by Science” (52) that the milk and apples “contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig” (52). Squealer also used fear by mentioning Mr. Jones. By using several techniques of propaganda, Squealer successfully convinces the other animals that it is fair to give all of the milk and apples to the pigs for the better of the farm.

Squealer uses propaganda techniques and tone along with a variety of sentence lengths in order to create a propaganda that influences the animals. One of the propaganda techniques that Squealer uses is the appeal to authority. He stated the fact that “whole management and organization of this farm depends on” (52) the pigs. Another technique he uses is the appeal to fear. He puts out a scenario that if “pigs fail in [their] duty”, “Jones would come back” (52). If the pigs do not eat the milk and apples, then Animalism would collapse and Mr. Jones would come back. Squealer completely convinces the animals when he mentions Mr. Jones because no one wants Mr. Jones to come back. Additionally, throughout his whole speech, Squealer uses a very friendly and caring tone. He did not yell at the animal to make them believe that it is fair for the pigs to receive all of the milk and animal. In order to create his friendly tone, he uses words such as “comrades”. Also, Squealers is saying that “it is for [the animals’] sake that [they] drink that milk and eat those apples” (52). He creates a caring tone in saying that “[m]any of [the pigs] actually dislike milk and apples” (52) but they do it anyways, for the better of the animals. Furthermore, Squealer also uses shorter sentences to get his most important points across. In short, right to the point sentences, he states that “pigs are brainworkers” (52) and “Jones would come back” (52). Overall, Squealers uses a combination of different techniques to create his propaganda.

In conclusion, Squealer’s speech about the milk and apples is important to the novel because it marks the starting of the downfall to Animalism. Also, the speech reveals the fact that propaganda, when delivered correctly, can deceive the public into thinking differently about one subject. Squealer’s speech reveals the flaws of Animalism. It highlights the fact that not all of the animals are equal because the pigs are slowly making their way to being the dominant animal; this is only the first step. They are beginning to separate themselves from the rest of the animals.

::HebaK:: 4 said...

It was almost unbelievable, said Squealer, that any animal could be so stupid. Surely, he cried indignantly, whisking his tail and skipping from side to side, surely they knew their beloved Leader, Comrade Napoleon, better than that? But the explanation was really very simple. The van had previously been the property of the knacker, and had been bought by the veterinary surgeon, who had not yet painted the old name out. That was how the mistake taken.(Orwell 125)"


Propaganda is used to falsely convey people of their emotions towards a specific subject. In the novel, Animal Farm by George Orwell, a propagandist explains a fellow animals “death” by using different techniques. Squealer, the propagandist, uses the quotes that Boxer always used , like “Napoleon is always right(Orwell 125),” to make the animals believe that Boxer peacefully died. Boxer, a strong horse, is supposedly taken to a vet after falling ill. He was transported in a van that was “marked ‘Horse Slaughter’(Orwell 125).” Animals become suspicious and have trouble believing in Boxers peaceful death. Squealer uses propaganda to make them believe in Boxers peaceful death and lead their emotions away from the vans markings. Squealer uses techniques, like demonizing the animals and a technique called flag -waving, to influence the animals. He does not want them knowing that Napoleon sold Boxer to a glue company. Squealer demonizes the suspicious by calling them stupid and naive. The technique called flag-waving that Squealer used, helped make the animals feel somewhat patriotic or/and make them feel better about them siding with Squealers and Napoleons opposition. Squealer represents this technique by saying “Surely they knew their beloved Leader, Comrade Napoleon better than that(Orwell 125).” He makes the animals believe that Napoleon would not give Boxer to a slaughter company by talking about their beloved leader. Squealers actions and speeches are important to the story because he is an accomplice of Napoleon. He is the one that keeps Napoleons actions concealed. Squealer covers them by using propaganda and misleading the animals. Without Squealer the true leader that Napoleon is would have been shown. Propaganda is used throughout the novel by Squealer to cover up the animals leaders falsehood.

Jonathan C. 4 said...

Propaganda is spreading false information in the form of media or to the public in some way. “Milk and apples contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brain works. The whole management and organization of this farm depend on us… Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back.” The pigs have drank more milk and eaten more apples than they were supposed to. The other animals are somewhat outraged and Squealer tries to calm them down. Squealer uses many good techniques while making this speech. The best method that he had used was bringing up Jones. He is a common enemy for the animals and that is what helps keep them calm and believe what he says. The animals hate Jones, and therefore they believe that anything to keep Jones away is good. This scene is important because it is the first time that readers get to see the beginning of the corruption in the Animalism ideal.
“Three days later it was announced that he had died in the hospital at Willingdon, in spite of receiving every attention a horse could have. Squealer came to announce the news to the others.” After Boxer had finally died, Squealer told everyone that he died peacefully in a hospital. This was not the case because he was sold to a glue factory. Squealer uses methods such as calming the group down to make sure nothing breaks out. He tells them peaceful things that they would defiantly want to hear. This scene is important because it is the final straw basically, before the animals finally start to revolt again. Squealer’s role at propaganda is good because he uses common enemies or topics to get on the public’s good side.

Jess L 2 said...

In Animal Farm, Squealer, the messenger pig for Napoleon, gives out all the orders and information to the other farm animals. His speeches like this are propoganda because their only purpose is to influence the animal's stances and persuade to do or think things, like in the speech I picked in which Squealer is trying to convince the animals to give pigs milk and apples, and we know that propoganda describes something that is set (usually by the government) to change the opinion of another.
He is very persuasive and the other animals always listen to what he has to say, for the most part without protest. A lot of the things Squealer says keeps the animals from arguing with him, since he makes them believe that, although it may not seem like it at times, "day and night [they are] watching over [the animals'] welfare" For example, when he says "The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us," he makes the animals think that they are too unintelligent to do anything by themselves anyway. Also, it is said earlier in the book that the way Squealer speaks and acts is very persuasive somehow, meaning the way he is always jumping back and forth and shaking his tail and such, which I guess helps him convince them. He is using his own twisted logic to convince the animals that the extra apples and milk need to go to the pigs in order for them to lead the farm to prosperity.
This speech is very important to the story. It is helping to provide insight into the character of Squealer and also build up the plot. It is starting to show how the pigs are lying to their "equals" and benefitting themselves instead of sharing, like they should be.

Hillary D 2 said...

"We pigs are brain workers. The whole management and organisation of this farm depend on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back!" (Animal Farm, 52)

In this passage, Squealer is attempting to persuade the animals on he farm into thinking the milk was reserved for a purpose. He tries to explain it is for the well beings of the pigs and therefore it benefits the well being of the animals also. Squealer is attempting to oppose the idea that the animals' hard-earned work was being fed to the pigs. He claims the pigs know they are no more equal than any other animal on the farm.

Squealer uses Jones' possible return to frighten the animals into believing the pigs keep them free and equal. The whole rebellion was to get rid of Jones and with him gone the pigs could then have an excuse to live lavishly. He uses the common man technique of propaganda to trick the animals. The pigs claim that Animalism gives all animals equality, but they treat themselves with much more respect and care--the animals get brainwashed. Boxer, being so uneducated, got fooled with the greatest impact. Saying the pigs are "brain workers" claims their high education and lowers the animals' self esteem. His words influence the simple minded creatures into believing something irrational.

This section is important to the story because it shows how propaganda affected all the farm animals. Persuasion is the best way to get away with anything and it helps keep rebellion from forming against the pigs. It shows how the pigs' methods kept all the animals clueless about their selfish deeds throughout the whole book. The Animalism that seemed so fair in the beginning eventually became clearly not.

Martin D 2 said...

“It had come to his knowledge, he said, that a foolish and wicked rumour
had been circulated at the time of Boxer's removal. Some of the animals
had noticed that the van which took Boxer away was marked "Horse
Slaughterer," and had actually jumped to the conclusion that Boxer was
being sent to the knacker's. It was almost unbelievable, said Squealer,
that any animal could be so stupid. Surely, he cried indignantly, whisking
his tail and skipping from side to side, surely they knew their beloved
Leader, Comrade Napoleon, better than that? But the explanation was really
very simple. The van had previously been the property of the knacker, and
had been bought by the veterinary surgeon, who had not yet painted the old
name out. That was how the mistake had arisen.

The animals were enormously relieved to hear this. And when Squealer went
on to give further graphic details of Boxer's death-bed, the admirable
care he had received, and the expensive medicines for which Napoleon had
paid without a thought as to the cost, their last doubts disappeared and
the sorrow that they felt for their comrade's death was tempered by the
thought that at least he had died happy.”
Orwell, George; Animal Farm (124)


The above passage elucidates the “actual cause” of Boxer’s death. The animals believed that Boxer was sent to a slaughter house, intentionally. Upon hearing this, Squealer made an announcement that the van truly was “the property of the knacker, [originally], and had been bought by the veterinary surgeon” (124), who forgot to “[paint] the old name out” (124). Their misunderstanding of the situation was reassured after Squealer’s “speech.”
Squealer needed to think of something immediately in order to lead the animals from the legitimacy. He applies the propaganda technique of “Ad nauseam,” which is Latin for “to the point of nausea.” It was the whole “their beloved Leader, Comrade Napoleon, [would know] better than that” (124), made them tired of hearing it, even though it may allow for a sigh of relief. In addition, Squealer spoke falsely of the van. It demonstrates that with a simple explanation, he could convince and influence the animals any way that he pleases.
The death of Boxer, who was a very hard worker and respected by many on the farm, is a significant scene of Animal Farm. Orwell’s employment of Boxer’s death, towards the end of the book, was a sweltering reflection of such a totalitarian rule, depicted by the pigs. This death sadly points to the downfall of Animal Farm. Boxer seems to not lack any good qualities apart from his limited intelligence, but, in the end, he becomes victim to his own virtues: loyalty and the willingness to “work harder” (126). Consequently, Boxer’s biggest mistake lies in his combination of the ideas of Animalism with the character of Napoleon, who, to him, “is always right” (126). All Boxer does is simply following Napoleon’s every order blindly, and naively assuming that the pigs will always have the farm’s best interest at heart, as well as in their minds. It is ironic that the system that he serves devotedly, ultimately results in betraying him.

DAvid T 2 said...

“Boxer!” cried Clover in a terrible voice. “Boxer! Get out! Get out quickly! They’re taking you to your death!” All the animals took up the cry of “Get out, Boxer, get out!” But the van was already gathering speed and drawing away from them. It was uncertain whether Boxer had understood what Clover had said. But a moment later his face disappeared from the window and there was the sound of a tremendous drumming of hoofs inside the van…Boxer's face did not reappear at the window.

Three days later it was announced that he had died in the hospital at Willingdon, in spite of receiving every attention a horse could have. Squealer came to announce the news to the others. He had, he said, been present during Boxer's last hours. “I was at his bedside at the very last. And at the end, almost too weak to speak, he whispered in my ear that his sole sorrow was to have passed on before the windmill was finished. 'Forward, comrades!' he whispered. ‘Forward in the name of the Rebellion. Long live Animal Farm! Long live Comrade Napoleon! Napoleon is always right.' Those were his very last words, comrades.”

It had come to his knowledge, he said, that a foolish and wicked rumour had been circulated at the time of Boxer's removal. Some of the animals had noticed that the van which took Boxer away was marked ‘Horse Slaughterer,’ and had actually jumped to the conclusion that Boxer was being sent to the knacker's. It was almost unbelievable, said Squealer, that any animal could be so stupid…The van had previously been the property of the knacker, and had been bought by the veterinary surgeon, who had not yet painted the old name out. That was how the mistake had arisen. (124-125)
Orwell, George, Animal Farm 124-125


In this passage from George Orwell’s Animal Farm, the animals from Animal Farm realize that Boxer is being taken away to a slaughter house. They all burst out in desperation; warning Boxer about what is occurring. The animals fail in trying save Boxer from death. Soon afterwards, Squealer appears and tells the animals that he had been “present during Boxers last hours.” Squealer tells the animals that Boxer wasn’t being sent to a slaughter house. He provides them with a bundle of propaganda in desire to manipulate them into following Napoleon without question.

The animals all knew that Boxer was going to die, and they tried to rescue him. Their love for Boxer was strong, but it did not last very long. When Squealer showed up, he brought them into a fantasy world. He provided them with propaganda and manipulated them into listening to Napoleon and himself. When the whole community of animals went into disarray over Boxer’s death and provided a possible rebellion against the pigs, Squealer enters the scene and tells them that he was “present during Boxers last hours.” He tells the animals that Boxer wanted them to live on and to go “forward in the name of the Rebellion.” Squealer also used Boxer’s phrase, “Napoleon is always right” to convince the animals that it was indeed Boxer who told him.

When there were still doubts about the slaughterhouse van, Squealer thinks ahead and tells the animals that it was “previously been the property of the [slaughterhouse], and had been bought by the veterinary surgeon, who [hadn’t painted] the old name out.” With this, Squealer successfully manipulates the animals and gives them a different point of view on the situation that had just previously occurred. Squealer uses his manipulative brain to prey on the simple minded animals. Not knowing any better, they follow Squealer, believing anything that comes out of his mouth.

Squealer is clearly manipulating the animals in the story. He uses his brains to create propaganda and misleads/influences the animals and their decisions. Throughout the book, Squealer helps create propaganda and through that, the community slowly changes without the animals’ realization. With Squealer’s propaganda, he can violate the commandments and mislead the animals to protect himself and Napoleon.

henry d:2 said...

Comrades!” he cried. “You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brain workers. The whole management and organization of this farm depends on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, “surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?” (Pages 52-53)

In this passage from George Orwell’s Animal Farm, Squealer tries to explain the situation after Snowball is caught stealing milk and apples from the farm. With the help of propaganda, Squealer easily manipulates the naïve animals into believing milk and apples should be kept solely for pigs. Tricking the naïve animals, Squealer stumbles onto the problem of opposing the Seven Commandments, breaking the foundation Animal Farm lived by.

Squealer uses many techniques to spread his lie engrossed propaganda to conceal their acts of greed. By hinting “Jones would come back,” he uses the technique of appealing towards fear to remind the animals of the human cruelty they once suffered. Squealer manipulates the animals with words like “comrades,” this gives the impression of loyalty towards them. Along with the constant use of “comrades” it becomes imbedded that Squealer is loyal regardless of his actions. He also uses words like “we”, “you”, and us” to further convince the animals everyone is together. Everything the pigs do is for the animals, this fallacy is created from Squealers reasons like “Day and night we are watching over your welfare.” Squealer’s use of propaganda has oppressed the animals, letting the pigs control the farm.

This passage is important for it shows how the working class can cause Totalitarianism. The animals are uneducated, loyal, and gullible often leads a leader to corruption because of no opposing power to correct unjustifiable actions. Squealer’s manipulation marked the end of Animalism and the beginning of Totalitarianism.

jimmy v. 2 said...

Page 52-53 - The explanation of the milk

In this passage from Animal Farm by George Orwell, Squealer is convincing the animals that the milk and apples reserved for the pigs is essential for their well being and in turn, the survival of the entire farm. Squealer first says that the notion of taking the apples and milk out of ''selfishness and privilege'' is unheard of. He tells them that ''[the pigs'] sole object in taking these things is to preserve [their] health''. Squealer then says that the pigs are ''brain workers'' and that they watch over the animals welfare. Playing into using a transfer form of propaganda, Squealer says that this act is for the animals benefit. Transfer, a form of propaganda, is an attempt to make the public view a certain subject the same way as they view another subject. In the case in Animal Farm, Squealer links the well being of the farm to the well being of the pigs. The other animals care about the survival of Animal Farm and if the pigs must be healthy and keep the apples and milk for themselves to protect Animal Farm, then the others will surely accept it.

Squealers use of propaganda is important to the relationship between the animals and the pigs. This scene makes the animals view the pigs as an asset to the farm. Squealers success in convincing the animals to believe this enables the pigs to further stretch their privileges. If the animals feel in debt of the pigs they are more likely to give in to the pigs' will.