Tuesday, January 22, 2008

Period 4 - The curious incident of the dog in the night-time


Heba
Ashley
Kellie
Jonathan

Feb. 1 - 1-74
Feb. 7 - 75-155
Feb. 14 - To the end


Please post by 8 p.m. prior to the discussion date.

33 comments:

Ashley N. 4 said...

What do you guys think of the way Mark Hodden uses graphics instead of describing what it looks like? I think it's really cute and kind of helpful. It's different, but I like it.

Ashley N. 4 said...

I meant Hadden, not Hodden. This doesn't count as another post I hope.

::HebaK:: 4 said...

I do not agree with Ashley. The pictures in the book make the novel seem like a childs book. It is hard for me, and some other people, to take the book seriously However, they are helpful and different.

Kellie L 4 said...

When Mark Hadden uses graphics, I think that he is trying to make the reader visualize what the main character, Christopher sees. Since Christopher is mentally challenged, I think that the author is trying to get the reader to see in the eyes of a child like Christopher because they view things differently. I do not agree with Heba because i can take the book seriously with graphics. I think the author used this technique to enhance the reader's mental knowledge of Christopher. Does anyone agree or disagree? Also, can anyone see any main themes occuring in the book yet?

Mr. Walsh said...

How does the graphics relate to his condition?

What do you make of how he sees the world?

Kellie said...

I think that the graphics relates to Christopher's condition because children with his disability are able to visualize things better. The graphics can represent Christopher's mind and how his mind works. Also, in the book Christopher mentions that he does not like things to be disorderly because it makes him feel uncomfortable. Maybe the graphics represent order and exactly how things should be in his world. In his world, Christopher sees everything as having a purpose and orderly. Christopher thinks that everything must have a solution because of Wellington's death. Also, when Christopher talks to his neighbors, he infers to the readers that their conversation was pointless because there was no productiveness behind their conversation. This shows how Christopher views the world. He thinks that the world is full of solutions and purposes. What does everyone else think? Also, does anyone think that there is a purpose or meaning to why Christopher numbers his chapters with prime numbers?

Jonathan C. 4 said...
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Jonathan C. 4 said...

I do not agree with Heba, the pictures do not make the book seem like a child's book. It helps keep my interest with the book because words are boring. I think the purpose of the pictures is to show us the real and logical things because Christopher said himself that he cannot lie or anything. Why does Christopher like, talk about the story and then the next part is just about something random, then after that the chapter is about the story again? Why do you guys think he does this?

Ashley N. 4 said...

I think it's his way of thinking. Like, it's sort of like a little kid talking basically, but with more mature words. Little kids try to stay on the subject, but tend to ramble on about other things. I think it makes it intresting, it sort of distracts from the story, but maybe it'll be useful later on in the story? The author must've added in that information for some reason. For like, characterization, or for some information that'll be used in the plot later on in the story.

Jonathan C. 4 said...

oo I think you are right Ashley. What did you guys think when he found out that that guy was actually sleeping with his mother? I didn't really see that coming. Now I wonder if she actually died of a heart attack or if his dad killed her. Maybe the dad wanted to tell him this but was afraid, so he killed the dog and planned this whole thing out to happen. The storyline is pretty easy to understand though, so it's a pretty easy read.

::HebaK:: 4 said...
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::HebaK:: 4 said...

I think the graphics relate to his condition because pictures are a way to express yourself. Chris, not knowingly, expresses himself by his pictures. His pictures are simple and bland, and involve numbers and logic most of the time. It shows that he is a serious type of person. Chris is not the type of person who has no emotions with his logic, and no emotions without logic. Is this a problem?

Jonathan C. 4 said...

Finally! someone does something to Chris. He was starting to annoy me with all his logic. I was glad his dad hit him, maybe he'll finally learn his lesson. Do you guys think he's going to learn his lesson after his dad's beatdown? I hope he does not write another book called "The Curious Incident of the Dog at Nightime" and that's what we are reading right now. I've already seen that done with the Outsiders book. I do not think that it is good that Chris only uses logic with not emotions, like, look how mad he got his dad. He was wrong and he knows it. So far in the novel, I do not like Chris. What about you guys?

Mr. Walsh said...

Question: Has your group discussed Chris' disorder? If you haven't, you should do research in this area. This will help you understand his logic and his character.

Jonathan C. 4 said...

Ok to start off, Mr. Walsh said Chris has autism. I don't remember him ever saying anything about that, so I decided to look up a little bit about Autism. "Autism is distinguished by a pattern of symptoms rather than one single symptom. The main characteristics are impairments in social interaction, impairments in communication, restricted interests and repetitive behavior. Other aspects, such as atypical eating, are also common but are not essential for diagnosis.[21] Individual symptoms of autism occur in the general population and appear not to associate highly, without a sharp line separating pathological severity from common traits." Anyone care to share what they think about this? Chris definatly seems to have autism because he hates being social, remember what his mom said in that letter to him? When they were in the store and Chris started crying and wet himself and broke two mixers. I don't really get what is happening now, I'm at the part when he runs away from home. So is his mom still living with that guy she cheated with?

Ashley N. 4 said...

I have a cousin who has autism, and it's sort of like they do as they please. Whatever pleases them they will do it, and like, they don't really have an emotional attachment to things. People are objects to them, and if they lose a certain person, such as their mom or whatever, it doesn't really affect them emotionally because there was no connection between the two in the first place. People with autism are able to feel basic emotions like, happiness, sadness, anger, but they aren't able to comprehend more advanced emotion like love. That's why in the beginning there's like a part where Chris identifies smiliey faces and he wasn't able to identify some of them.

And yes, his mom is living with Mr. Shears I think they're living in London.

::HebaK:: 4 said...

In my research about Chris’s conditions, I found out that he has a specific type of autism; the Asperger syndrome. This is when the intelligence of the person is above average but they lack social and communication skills as well as repetitive or restrictive patterns of thought and behavior. Chris displays all these symptoms. Chris’s autism helps me understand his character and yet makes it more difficult. This is because Chris has a problem with emotions, how am I supposed to know what he truly feels or is he feels at all?

AND is his dad absolutely crazy? Why would you tell your son that his mother died, did he do this because he knew that Chris wouldn’t be as devastated like a normal kid would be?

Kellie said...

Well, I don't think that Chris' dad is crazy Heba. Maybe he thought that it would be best if Christopher didn't know the truth about his mother. Also, his dad knows how emotional Christopher is. Christopher doesn't come off as the type of person who would be "devistated" if his mother died because Christopher doesn't show that many feelings in the book so far. He even admitted that he couldn't tell if people were sad or happy in the beginning of the book.

::HebaK:: 4 said...

To answer Jonathon’s previous question, I would say that I do not mind Chris. Yes, his way of talking and thinking are different but I have meet worse first person narrators. Such as, Elizabeth Wurtzel in Prozac Nation. All she did was complain about life and complain about wanting to fix it. Elizabeth’s situation helps me sympathize Chris’s condition, and problems. Elizabeth was so wound up in herself, she didn’t even consider that people had it worse than her and on different levels. Chris has autism and was lied to by his criminal father about his mothers death. That’s pretty devastating, especially because Chris have problems with his emotions.

Ashley N. 4 said...

I don't think his dad is crazy either. I mean like, if you were in that position I think it feel easier to tell your kid that his mother died rather than tell him that his mother ran off with the next door neighboor. And now they're living in London and they 'do sex' together.
Because like, first of all I guess he thought that Chris would have a hard time understanding that situation and secondly, I think his father was in denial at the time. And it was really sort of like Chris's mother 'died' not physically, but rather she just ceased to exist in their family. She sort of just left them for themselves.

Do you think she left because of Chris? Or because of Chris's dad? Or because of something else?

::HebaK:: 4 said...

People, I was being hypothetical about his dad being crazy! I did not mean it literally.

Kellie said...

I definately agree with Heba because Elizabeth and Chris have the same problems. Chris is more down to earth though because he is not as conceited as Elizabeth. Elizabeth was like a menace because she went out looking for trouble. Chris on the other hand tries to please the people he is with and he does not rant about how hard he has it.

Also, Christopher is so logical because his form of autism causes him to understand more facts, than common sense. It is easier for him to read a book and learn things from that than to carry out a conversation with a person.

::HebaK:: 4 said...
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::HebaK:: 4 said...

I love the fact that Chris was brave enough to travel to London to his mother. I think that no matter what, a mothers bond is bigger than a fathers. A child regularly wants to be with his mother, however Chris was told his mother had died. That was VERY wrong for his father to have done that. He says he did it to protect Chris, but do you guys think there was another reason?

Kellie L 4 said...

Heba, along with protecting Chris, his dad may have had many other reasons to lie to his son. Because of Chris' disability, the father may have not wanted to tell him the truth because Chris might have not understood what he was talking about. Also, Chris' dad may have wanted to forget about everything that happened between him and his wife. Telling Chris that his mother died was probably the best thing that he could do. If he had told the truth, it would have crushed Chris because his mother was cheating, and she decided to run away to London, away from Chris. I think that Chris' father was being considerate of his son's feelings and that it was the right thing to do.

Jonathan C. 4 said...

I agree with Kellie. It was good of his dad to lie, but that obviously did not go well with the way Chris thinks. Telling him that his mother died was probably a good idea, because it was the lesser of two evils. If he had known she was alive then he'd miss her and it would turn into a huge mess. Chris would want to see her and he'd miss her, and Chris' dad wouldn't be too happy seeing her, etc. What did you guys think of the ending?

Jonathan C. 4 said...
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::HebaK:: 4 said...

I loved the last sentence! "That means I can do anything." It is so..."I am awesome."

I think Chris has grown up since the beggining of the book. He wore yellow, he took the train, he bacame braver, and he passed the A tests, or whatever they are called. How do you guys think he matured, or excelled?

Jonathan C. 4 said...

I thought the ending was a little strange, but it made sense in Chris' world. A math problem of life, I kind of saw it coming but that's only because he loved math so much. It was a weird ending. The book overall itself was pretty ok, but it was kind of predictable at many points in the story. I'd give the book probably a 7 out of ten. Something around there. It only kept my interest for a while, but when it did it was pretty entertaining.

Kellie L 4 said...

I agree with Jonathan, the book was predictable at some points. But, I think that was how the book was made to be because of Chris' predictability. I would give this book an 8 because it was so entertaining. There were some parts when Chris' thoughts would just make you laugh. Also, I thought that is was an easy read. Did anyone understand why the last sentence was so great?

Ashley N. 4 said...

I don't know, I thought it was an okay sentence. It was cute, but I think if you're looking for a book with really good quotes "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" is recommended.
"I can do anything" gives me an overall feeling superiority, or something. Like the quote "I am infinite" from "The Perks of Being a Wallflower". Just reading it makes you feel a bit more important, a bit better about yourself. I also think Chris matured, but I don't think he'd be doing anything that risque for a while.

How do you think it worked out in the end with Chris's mom and his dad? Like, past the ending of the book.

::HebaK:: 4 said...

I think Chris's parents will have work things out, in the future, for the sake of Chris.

Ashley N. 4 said...

I do too. Sorry for posting so late by the way, I got home late. I give this book an 8 out of 10. I think it lacked emotional connection, but at the same time that's what made it so good.