Monday, March 10, 2008

MOTIF: A Tale of Two Cities



From the all-knowing and occasionally reliable wikipedia:
In a narrative, such as a novel or a film, motifs are recurring structures, contrasts, or literary devices that can help to develop and inform the text’s major themes. The narrative motif is the vehicle of means by which the narrative theme is conveyed. The motif can be an idea, an object, a place, or a statement.


I want to know what motif you are tracing. Easy Homework grade.

Write down what motif you chose and a few sentences why you picked that motif.

14 comments:

Cristina V 2 said...

The motif I have been following through out A Tale of Two Cities is being recalled to life and death. Being "recalled to life" appeared a numerous amount of times in the fist book. From the saying "recalled to life" comes the event of death. I have been following this because I thought in the beginning that Mr. Lorry was going to be "recalled to life."

Amir Q. 4 said...

I have been following two motifs. The first being betrayal, as I noticed it appear many times throughout the book. It has recently appeared in chapter 11, where Mr. Stryver betrays Sydney Carton (to a point) in revealing his feelings about Lucie Manette to him. The 2nd being stones, which Dickens’ uses everywhere throughout the book, from describing the stony and jagged roads in the wine scene to the dead of the Monseigneur.

Ngoc D. 4 said...

Mr. Walsh, one thing, how come you like Wikipedia while other teachers hate it?

I choose two motifs which are wine and stone but I'm following wine more closely. I choose wine because the wine scene with the people scrambling to get really caught my eye. So far, wine has appear again, though with not much significant. I picked stone because it appears many times over and over again.

Mr. Walsh said...

I like Wikipedia for basic, general information. It should not be used for research purposes. It should also be scrutinized for bias and reliability.

I think Wikipedia is a good jumping off point and a tool to obtain general information about a topic. Such as, if you didn't what a Gorgon's head was (like I didn't), and you want a brief overview, wikipedia should suffice.

I hope that explains wikipedia - I'm also a minutia freak - therefore I love it.

Chloe C 2 said...

I've been tracing knitting. I was going to trace digging, but after about 10 chapters of virtually nothing and finding knitting again, I decided to jump over. My reasons are very simple. Knitting is concentrated to one area and one character, so it is easier to identify. And, personally, I thought it would be easier to formulate an idea if a motif wasn't scattered all over the place and barely given any description. Plus by now, you can see knitting has become very important.

::HebaK:: 4 said...

The motif I chose to trace was dualism, contradicting terms. Dickens uses them through out the novel. Whether he uses a word differently from its true meaning or uses doppelgangers, they all seem significant. I believe his use of "two-ness" has a deeper meaning, one that wraps around the plot of the story.

DAvid T 2 said...

The motif that I have chosen is knitting. At first I had thought that I knew everything about knitting, or had i pretty good idea about what it means. But, as the book went on, I found out that knitting was something a little different from what I originally thought. So, now I want to learn more about kitting as a motif.

barbara j 2 said...

The motif I have been tracing throughout the book is knitting. At first I didn’t really paid attention to it but I just wanted to know about what Madame Defarge was knitting as I started seeing it more. Also because she would be knitting at random moments and every scene that she is in she is knitting something.

Hillary D 2 said...

The motif I am tracing is knitting. I chose this because I didn't know it was such a big deal until later and I thought it was interesting. I soon found out what Madame Defarge was knitting, but it can mean something so much more than a hobby. Since there are a few chapters dedicated to knitting I thought, "Why not?"

Jen-T 4 said...

The motif that im tracing through A Tale of Two Cities is darkness. I choose darkness because its interesting how Dickens always has darkness in the setting or when describing characters. Theres always some kind of dark or gloomy feel to the story and it makes me wonder why dark, as if theres something hidden that Dickens is trying to suggest.

Martin D 2 said...

I originally chose knitting as my motif. This was because in every scene, where Madame Defarge was present, you would "see" her knitting, so I wanted to know what the significance of the knitting was. Now that I do; I find it very interesting.

Katherine Z 4 said...

The motif that I choose was "Recalled to Life." There have been numerous occasions where "recalled to life" have appeared, though usually appeared in another form, like "restore or reclaimed." There were also many different meanings to this word, depending on the event that surrounds this word. I think there will be many people or even places that will be brought back to life, after it goes through some sort of destruction or tragedy.

Kellie L 4 said...

The motif I have been following is wine. I picked wine as a motif because throughout the book, wine was used and there were numerous chapters based on wine. I also think that tracing wine as a motif would be interesting because comparing the Defarges' wine shop and the actual wine might be important to the real meaning of the wine. The wine was also compared to blood, which made me think of grusome death. Analyzing wine might help me understand how the revolution is coming along.

Thanh N. 4 said...

I'm tracing prison as a motif. I chose it because it occurred a lot in some of the chapters (which is why it's a motif), but I also thought there was a great significance to why it's there. Also, I want to know why Dr. Manette became the way he is after being in prisons. It might be interesting to learn how the prisons are and what they could do to a person.